Trump to slash refugee admissions to U.S.

By Bob Unruh

Refugees at a United Nations camp in South Sudan. At least 95 percent of the refugees sent to the U.S. are picked by the U.N.

Refugees at a United Nations camp in South Sudan. At least 95 percent of the refugees sent to the U.S. are picked by the U.N.

President Trump “mostly got his way” with making huge changes in the refugee outline Barack Obama had established for the nation before he left office, and this weekend is expected to finish the work by installing a plan that’s entirely his own.

President Trump long has said that he wants a closer examination of those arriving in the United States from areas of the world that allow – even encourage – terrorism. He announced a brief pause in that activity from several countries, and even though he was attacked by “courts, immigrant activists and Democrats on Capitol Hill,” he “mostly got his way,” according to a report in the Washington Times.

“It’s impossible to escape the clear message that there’s a new sheriff in town,” Matthew O’Brien, a spokesman at the Federation for American Immigration Reform, told the news outlet.

A Supreme Court argument on those initial limits was canceled this week after the time period expired, and the president announced a new temporary slowdown in the admissions for a total of eight suspect nations.

The report noted that in just eight months in office, Trump cut by more than half the 110,000-refugee target established by Obama.

“Gone is President Obama’s overwhelming focus on Muslims, and particularly on Syrians fleeing a civil war that his administration facilitated. Under Mr. Trump, the rate of Syrian refugees has been cut by more than 80 percent, and Christians have overtaken Muslims in total refugees resettled,” the Times said.

America is headed down a suicidal path. contends Leo Hohmann in his jolting best-seller “Stealth Invasion: Muslim Conquest Through Immigration and Resettlement Jihad,” available now in hard copy or e-book at the WND Superstore.

Others have noticed the change, too, with the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees lowering the number of refugee candidates it submits to the U.S. from 35,000 last year to only about 3,600 so far this year.

“As of Tuesday afternoon, with four days left in the fiscal year, the government had admitted slightly more than 53,000 refugees — less than half of Mr. Obama’s goal but slightly more than Mr. Trump wanted,” the report said.

Muslims dropped from nearly half of the total to about a third, and Christians rose from 43 percent to 53 percent.

The new fiscal year begins on Sunday, and it is for that coming year that President Trump now will establish an entirely new plan all his own.

The Wall Street Journal has speculated that goal is going to be about 45,000.

It cited information from “people familiar with the discussions” in explaining, “The State Department had initially pushed for a cap of at least 50,000 but later Secretary of State Rex Tillerson overruled career staff and revised its recommendation to the president to 45,000. The Department of Homeland Security recommended a figure closer to 40,000.”

The Journal noted, “At a speech last week at the United Nations General Assembly, Mr. Trump argued it is far more efficient to help refugees where they live. ‘For the cost of resettling one refugee in the United States, we can assist more than 10 in their home region,’ he said.”

Since 1980 the law has allowed the president sole authority to set the limits on refugee admissions each year. It often has been as high as 110,000 and never before now below 67,000, the report said.

It continued, “DHS argued that admitting fewer refugees would allow the agency to direct more resources toward vetting applications for asylum. Refugees remain outside the U.S. while their applications are considered; asylum applicants are filed by people who are already here. The refugee and asylum programs are similar in that both require applicants to show a well-founded fear of persecution based on race, religion, nationality, political belief or membership in a social group.”

WND reported this month experts confirmed that the president’s control over refugee numbers starting Oct. 1, the new fiscal year, is approaching absolute.

Trump, in accordance with the Refugee Act of 1980, must send a presidential-determination letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee informing Congress of the annual cap on refugees. This cap or “ceiling” is the maximum number of refugees the Trump administration wants to allow into the U.S. in fiscal 2018.

Robert Spencer, director of Jihad Watch for the David Horowitz Freedom Center, encouraged Trump to make good on his promise.

“Follow through on his campaign promises, and stop the refugee influx entirely until such time, even if it never comes, when we can distinguish jihad terrorists from peaceful refugees,” Spencer said.

Trump famously said during his campaign he would suspend the program entirely “until we can figure out what the hell is going on” with regard to rising Islamic terrorism across the globe.

Ann Corcoran, who has followed refugee resettlement for years, said Trump has plenty of reason to do just that and still come across as a great humanitarian by focusing on needy Americans.

“The public should be outraged to learn that in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, which have left tens of thousands of Americans homeless, that we are poised to take in thousands of impoverished refugees when we now have our own refugees, struggling people who have lost their homes, lost everything, with their lives shattered, living in tents, shelters and RVs,” Corcoran said. “To bring in more from other countries in a time like this would be the ultimate insanity.”

The U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement spends more than $2 billion annually to resettle foreign refugees into American cities, but that doesn’t include welfare benefits such as Medicaid, food stamps, subsidized housing and educating refugee children. All told, the program has been estimated at up to $10 billion per year.

Daniel Horowitz, author of the book “Stolen Sovereignty,” says Trump’s job is actually quite simple.

“Obama used [his authority under the Refugee Act] to the detriment of the country to bring in over 100,000 refugees in his last year in office; Trump can use it to protect our security by setting the cap at zero,” Horowitz wrote in the Conservative Review.

America is headed down a suicidal path. contends Leo Hohmann in his jolting best-seller “Stealth Invasion: Muslim Conquest Through Immigration and Resettlement Jihad,” available now in hard copy or e-book at the WND Superstore.

Source:: World Net Daily – World

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